Large Glass Bottle

Ancient Roman Large Garum Condiment Glass Bottle Conical Fluted and Lipped Glass

Ancient Roman Large Garum Condiment Glass Bottle Conical Fluted and Lipped Glass
Ancient Roman Large Garum Condiment Glass Bottle Conical Fluted and Lipped Glass
Ancient Roman Large Garum Condiment Glass Bottle Conical Fluted and Lipped Glass
Ancient Roman Large Garum Condiment Glass Bottle Conical Fluted and Lipped Glass
Ancient Roman Large Garum Condiment Glass Bottle Conical Fluted and Lipped Glass
Ancient Roman Large Garum Condiment Glass Bottle Conical Fluted and Lipped Glass

Ancient Roman Large Garum Condiment Glass Bottle Conical Fluted and Lipped Glass    Ancient Roman Large Garum Condiment Glass Bottle Conical Fluted and Lipped Glass
Ancient Roman Large Garum Condiment Bottle Conical Fluted and Lipped Green. Height at 12.51 cm, maximum body diameter at 8.42 cm, foot diameter at 5.56cm, Upper lip diameter at 5 cm: weight at 174.31 grams.

This is a large and thickly blown glass bottle, which is conically fluted in two body collars with a rising thinning neck and finished with a pouring lip. It is suggested that the vessel is a condiment bottle, which may have contained Garum or Olive Oil it would have been an item that was prized at the time of manufacture. The vessel has a fine pale green colour tint to the glass achieved by the application of mineral copper to the silicate during the melt. Very Fine no chips or cracks.

The glass vessels was acquired from a private German collection, where Celtic and Roman material feature in very fine condition. It is said, however, cannot now be proved due to the lack of original documentation that it is said to have been discovered in the former Roman province of Dacia in central Europe in the early 1900s by an antiquarian excavating a Roman Civitas or suspected town location. Indeed, I suspect that it must have been removed from a cemetery context as this is where such items were left for the libation of the deceased. It has nonetheless survived in excellent condition and gives us a rare opportunity to appreciate the art of the object itself.

The use of the man-made material called glass a mix of soda, silica, and lime pre-dates the Romans by over 1,500 years, but even they seem not to have fully understood the complexity of the component mix and the necessity for lime to make the glass impervious to water and much more durable to the ravages of time and use. Lime can be found naturally, for example, as part of the silica component in the form of sand which contains a significant percentage of crushed seashells. Indeed, two areas became noted for the high quality of their glass along the Belarus River in. And the Volturnus River in Campania not coincidentally, areas where the sand was particularly rich in lime. However, some Roman glassmakers, perhaps without knowing exactly why, did understand that the addition of small pebbles and shells could affect the final quality of the glass produced.

The use of glass before Roman times was mainly restricted to small opaque bottles or large bowls, very often made in imitation of metal-wares. Early glass was usually opaque due to the high number of tiny air bubbles within the glass as a result of the firing process and usually had a pale green or yellow hue due to the presence of impurities.

The colour tint of the glass could, though, be manipulated by increasing or decreasing the level of oxygen in the furnace. Colours could also be achieved by adding small amounts of metals to the mix; adding copper produced blue, green, and red, manganese produced pink and red, cobalt a deep blue, calcium white, and lead brought a yellow tint. With the invention of glassblowing (blowing the glass whilst still hot through a hollow iron rod 1 to 1.5 m long) in the 1st century BCE, a better quality of glass was produced, and the production process became faster and cheaper with the consequence that vessels made from glass became much more common, everyday objects. This trend was increased further by the invention of the glassblowing furnace in the 1st century CE.

As Strabo noted in his. A glass vessel could be bought in the 1st century CE for only a copper coin.

The exact location and time of the invention of this new production method is not known, but the earliest examples of blown glass date from the 1st century BCE in the areas of Syria and Palestine. This is also the time when the Latin word for glass. The item "Ancient Roman Large Garum Condiment Glass Bottle Conical Fluted and Lipped Glass" is in sale since Saturday, March 2, 2019. This item is in the category "Antiques\Antiquities\Roman".

The seller is "ancientpasts" and is located in Peterborough. This item can be shipped worldwide.

  • Type: Glass Condiment Bottle
  • Provenance: AP - COA Available
  • Material: Glass
  • Colour: Green


Ancient Roman Large Garum Condiment Glass Bottle Conical Fluted and Lipped Glass    Ancient Roman Large Garum Condiment Glass Bottle Conical Fluted and Lipped Glass